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25 Apr
The Korean basic vowels

The Korean basic vowels (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just copy-n-paste what I read.

“The names of the seven levels are derived from the non-honorific imperative form of the verb hada (하다; “to do”) in each level, plus the suffix che (), which means “style”. Each Korean speech level can be combined with honorific or non-honorific noun and verb forms. Taken together, there are 14 combinations.”

“There are seven verb paradigms or speech levels in Korean, and each level has its own unique set of verb endings which are used to indicate the level of formality of a situation.[citation needed] Unlike honorifics—which are used to show respect towards the referent (whom you are talking about) —speech levels are used to show respect towards a speaker’s or writer’s audience (whom you are talking to). The names of the seven levels are derived from the non-honorific imperative form of the verb 하다 (hada, “do”) in each level, plus the suffix 체 (“che”, hanja: 體), which means “style”.

The highest six levels are generally grouped together as jondaenmal (존댓말), while the lowest level (haeche, 해체) is called banmal (반말) in Korean.”

 

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